What is the most colorful country

Get out of the dreary gray of everyday life and into a fascinating world full of colors: Stilpalast presents 12 of the most colorful cities on this planet that really make you want to travel. Nice wanderlust!

Bo-Kaap, Cape Town, South Africa

The district of Cape Town, formerly known as the Malay Quarter, with its brightly colored mosques and houses is now one of the countless tourist attractions that the so-called Mother City has to offer. The colors of the historically Muslim quarter should be an expression of freedom.

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Balat, Istanbul, Turkey

Balat is one of the oldest and most exciting quarters of Istanbul. The colored buildings appear like a kaleidoscope, lining the streets as if they were piled up and are loosened up by new boutiques, cafés and galleries. The district is particularly hip for design-loving tourists.

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Jodhpur, India

The blue city of Jodhpur in the western state of Rajasthan owes its coloring to India's caste system. The upper class used to paint their houses in the royal shade to differentiate themselves from the lower castes. In the course of time, however, other castes followed this “trend”, which is why the city can now completely adorn itself in a blue dress. A small side effect: the blue color protects against termites and keeps the apartments cool in the hot sun.

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Willemstad, Curacao

The cheerful colors of the capital of the Caribbean dream island Curaçao actually have a health background and were not chosen as an ornament. In the 19th century, a governor of the Dutch colony believed that bright white caused his migraines. For this reason he had the buildings painted in bright colors by decree. Today this historic part of the city is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Trinidad, Cuba

The historic buildings of the Cuban city of Trinidad in the Sancti Spíritu province, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, reflect the lush green of sugar cane, the blue of the ocean and the yellow of the sun. The highlights include the old San Francisco Monastery, the Palacio Brunet and the Palacio Cantero.

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Burano, Italy

The fact that the colorful houses on the Venetian island of Burano can be seen from afar like a beacon was deliberately chosen. According to tradition, the local fishermen painted their houses in bright colors to help them find their way home. What used to be a means to an end is now the law: Anyone who lives on the island and wants to paint their house is assigned a color by the government.

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Juzcar, Spain

Contrary to what was expected, the special color of the small town of Júzcar in Andalusia has no historical background. For once, the Hollywood dream factory is to blame for this. A promotional film was shot in the village for the 3D film “The Smurfs”, which is why all the houses were bathed in Smurfy blue. Upon completion of the shoot, Sony offered to restore the city to its original state. But the residents declined with thanks. Probably not least because the unusual color has turned the village into a tourist magnet.

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Rainbow Row, Charleston, USA

According to local rumors, the pastel-colored terraced house facades of the historic waterfront in Charleston, South Carolina, were used by drunken seafarers to find their guest house in their delirium. Today the houses between 83 and 107 Easy Bay Street are synonymous with the popular “Southern city”.

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Pelourinho, Salvador, Brazil

Pelourinho, which translates as “pillory”, was home to the first slave market on the continent. The city has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1985 and was slowly but steadily rebuilt in the course of this honor. Today the culture is livelier than ever and the city with its colorful facades is a hotspot for food and dance.

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Valparaíso, Chile

If you stroll through the historic center of Valparaíso, the most important port city in Chile and at the same time the cultural center of the country, you might think you have landed in an outdoor gallery. The cheerful facades are not pretty to look at, but also hide numerous restaurants, clubs and all kinds of shops.

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St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada

Why the residents of St. John’s, the provincial capital of Newfoundland and Labrador, began painting their Victorian homes in bright colors in the 1970s is unclear. The so-called “Jellybean Houses” undoubtedly provide bright spots when the dark season begins in the northeastern part of Canada.

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La Boca, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The Caminito, a short pedestrian zone in the famous La Boca district in the Argentine capital Buenos Aires, was an eyesore for a long time until the local artist Benito Quinquela Martín motivated the residents of the street to grab paint and buckets and use the corrugated iron in the late 1950s. and giving wooden houses a bright coat of paint.

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