Are house cats related to the bobcats

On the cultural history of the house cat with special consideration of its diseases


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https://refubium.fu-berlin.de/handle/fub188/3863
http://dx.doi.org/10.17169/refubium-8063
Cover sheet \ - Imprint a personal thanks Table of contents 1 Introduction and task 1 2 Material and methodology 3 3 Zoological systematics of the cat family 4 4 The prehistoric period (~ 500,000 to ~ 3000 BC) 11 5 Descent and domestication of the house cat 13 6 Domestic cat nomenclature and a definition of terms 21 7 Distribution of domestic cats 23 8 Cultural history of domestic cats 31 9 Veterinary activity over the centuries and its relationship to cats 69 10 Selected diseases of domestic cats and their history 87 11 Summary discussion 125 12 Summary 135 13 Summary 137 Bibliography List of Figures List of Abbreviations Appendix / Acknowledgments
dc. description. abstract
The scientific name of the house cat is Felis silvestris forma catus Linnaeus, 1758. The historically oldest finds of cats that can be associated with humans come from Jericho (approx. 8000 BC) and Anatolia (approx. 6000 BC) . Either of these are the earliest adobe villages where people lived in large, permanent communities. This was made possible by the natural occurrence of wild grain. It stands to reason that native wild cats settled there in the farming villages and were later tamed or even domesticated because of their usefulness. However, only assumptions are permissible in this regard. The roughly simultaneous occurrence of cats on the Greek islands, in Egypt and Pakistan can be due to the extensive trade of high cultures as well as the result of analogous domestications. Whether the ancient Egyptian cats were the first domesticated cats is debatable. It is very likely that the Egyptians were the first to breed cats on this scale. Although the North African falcon Felis silvestris libyca Forster, 1780, is named as ancestor in almost all publications, today it can only be said with certainty that the domestic cats are descended from the species Felis silvestris. Starting from the Mediterranean area, domestic cats spread to Europe and were an integral part of the European domestic animal world around 1000 AD. In Eastern Asia the house cat was already 800 BC. Known. Their occurrence in America is first mentioned in 1626 and in Australia in 1798. The reputation of an unpredictable predator and other characteristics made cats a part of religious practices in ancient Egypt. The cultural meaning of the cat must not be equated with admiration or even love. The Egyptians already killed cats for ritual purposes. The cat was pursued in all parts of the world it colonized. This culminated especially in Germany under the influence of the Christian Church in the almost complete extermination of cats in the 15th to 17th centuries. Even if the cat has always been a favorite animal, the main reason for keeping it was to control pests. In this role she saved mankind from immeasurable economic damage. In the late Middle Ages and modern times, the cat was also a supplier of fur, meat and raw materials for the manufacture of medicines and magic substances. The experimental animal cat plays a subordinate role. Nowadays, however, their psycho-hygienic and social function in society should not be underestimated. The cat occupies a large place in popular beliefs, scriptures and customs. Mostly it symbolizes falsehood, bad luck, greed and lust. Rarely does it represent happy events. This symbolism is the content of many animal tales and legends as well as proverbs and sayings. The cat was and is the muse of many important writers and artists. It was not until the middle of the 18th century that isolated literature about keeping and caring for cats appeared, with the general view being that cats suffered from the same diseases as dogs. Therapy was mostly refrained from because of their defenselessness and anyway robust nature. The first comprehensive textbook on cat diseases was published by KIRK in 1925. From then on, the teaching of cat diseases developed rapidly and reached a climax in 1996 with the establishment of the European Society for Feline Medicine, which has over 700 members worldwide. The historically interesting diseases of house cats include rabies as one of the oldest zoonoses and other infectious diseases, about whose disease traits historical records exist or which, due to their morbidity and mortality, are of great importance for the overall population of cats. These include cat flu, panleukopenia, feline leukosis, FIP and FIV. Much importance was attached to parasitosis, and especially mange and its therapy, in the first publications on cats. In 2003 the cat was the number one pet owner in Germany with 6.9 million animals.
dc. description. abstract
The scientific name of the domestic cat is Felis silvestris forma catus Linnaeus, 1758. The historically earliest findings of cats in connection with human beings were made in Jericho (approx. 800 B.C.) and Anatolia (approx. 6000 B.C.). In both cases it was in mud cottage villages in which people lived in large, stable communities. The growing of wild corn in the surroundings of the villages made it possible for cats to exist. Most likely local wild cats settled in these farm villages and because of their usefulness were tamed and finally domesticated. However, only assumptions may be made in this respect. The parallel appearance of cats on the Greek islands, Egypt and Pakistan may be based on the extended trading of the highly civilized cultures as well as a result of analogous domestication. Whether the ancient Egyptian cats were the first domesticated ones, as is commonly believed, is debatable. However, the Egyptians were most likely the first ones who bred cats to a large extend. The African wild cat Felis silvestris libyca Forster, 1780 is mentioned as progenitor in almost every publication, however, we can only be certain that our domestic cat stems from the race Felis silvestris. The domestic cat spread from the area along the Mediterranean Sea to Europe and around 1000 A.D. became a firm part of the European domestic animal world. In Eastern Asia the domestic cat was already known 800 B.C. In the United States of America its existence was first documented in 1626 and in Australia in 1798. Because of its reputation of being an unpredictable beast of prey along with other characteristics the cat was a part of religious acts in the ancient Egypt. This must not be understood as worship of or even love for the cat. The Egyptians killed cats during rituals. The cat was persecuted in every continent. The persecution reached its peak under the influence of the Christian Church and especially in Germany in the 15th-17th Century the cat was nearly exterminated. Even if the cat in single cases was kept as a pet, the main reason for keeping cats was their participation in pest control. This trait saved the human race from immeasurable economical damage. During the end of the middle age and beginning of the new age the cat was furthermore deliverer of fur, meat and raw materials used for the production of medicine and witch craft. As laboratory animal the cat plays only a minor role. Today, however, its psychohygienic and social role must not be underestimated. The cat plays a large role in public belief as well as in literature and customs. It mainly symbolizes falseness, misfortune, greed and lust. It seldom stands for fortune. This symbolic is contained in animal tales and legends as well as in proverbs and idioms. Nevertheless the cat always has been the muse of many important literary men and performers. In the middle of the 18th century miscellaneous literature appears for the first time which now and then relates to cat keeping and care, whereby the general opinion was that cats suffer from the same diseases as dogs. Therapy was often neglected because of the cat's resistance and robust constitution. The first specialized book about cat diseases was published in 1925. Thereafter the science about cat diseases developed rapidly and reached its peak in 1996 with the foundation of the European Society for Feline Medicine with more than 700 members world wide. One historically interesting disease of the domestic cat is the rabies as the oldest known infectious disease for which man is susceptible to as well as additional infectious diseases about whose epidemic occurrences historical deliveries exist or those infectious diseases having a large impact on cat population based on their morbidity and mortality. These include Panleukopenia, cat flu, FIP, FIV and the FeLV infection. In early publications much attention was paid to the parasitic diseases, mainly the scabies, especially in regards to its therapy. In 2003 the cat with a number of 6.9 million was the number one pet in Germany.
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600 Technology, Medicine, Applied Sciences :: 630 Agriculture :: 630 Agriculture and Allied Areas
On the cultural history of the house cat with special consideration of its diseases
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urn: nbn: de: kobv: 188-2004002860
The history of civilization of the domestic cat with special regard to its diseases
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http://www.diss.fu-berlin.de/2004/286/
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