Is there true love among teenagers

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Post # 1, written on April 15, 2015 | 03:24 am
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last edited on 04/15/2015 | 03:28 am
Huhu :)
There is one question that has preoccupied me with my couples for a long time: after how many months would you speak of love that is based more on infatuation and superficial infatuation?
I already know that you can fall in love at first sight, but love isn't yet.

How long is the period of time for your couple before you would really say that it is love?
Or is there love at first sight?
Or are there also love stories that you would find credible after a few weeks or so?
Do you find it important to at least first build a friendly base before a relationship develops?
Another sensitive topic: How long should it take for enemies to become lovers?


I think that half a year feels good (that is, to have known each other for half a year), but I'm not sure about that. For some it seems too short, I might imagine. ^^ "


----

For me personally, my protagonist is a fifteen-year-old, suspicious boy who has already been through a lot, in the sense that he saw his family die, but does not completely block the people around him. He knows he's gay. That's not the big hurdle.
His future boyfriend is a sunny boy, a much more trustworthy, seventeen / eighteen-year-old boy from a well-protected home.
They get to know each other and it's not love at first sight, but anything but dislike. : D
After about two months they travel together (and with a friend), so they see each other every day / have a room for three: talk, get to know, fool around, experience a lot together, not nice things etc ... and maybe need Pi again Thumb two months for the first kiss, because being suspicious complicates life in some places and actually the hormones would urge such a fifteen-year-old in love to do so earlier, but he is too proud, deliberate, to become the victim of his hormones. ^^ "

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Would you find it credible if after half a year one could not only speak of a teenage infatuation, but of a more serious relationship / love?
I know the parents of friends who met and married when they were sixteen or earlier. Of course, this is rare, but not impossible. Unfortunately, it is rarely shown credibly.
With adolescents it is more and more difficult for their relationships to be taken seriously. Often for a good reason.

I'm happy about your opinions :)
Post # 2, written on April 15, 2015 | 10:09 a.m.
Charizard
Huhu :)
There is one question that has preoccupied me with my couples for a long time: after how many months would you speak of love that is based more on infatuation and superficial infatuation?
I already know that you can fall in love at first sight, but love isn't yet.

How long is the period of time for your couple before you would really say that it is love?
Or is there love at first sight?
Or are there also love stories that you would find credible after a few weeks or so?
Do you find it important to at least first build a friendly base before a relationship develops?
Another sensitive topic: How long should it take for enemies to become lovers?


I think that half a year feels good (that is, to have known each other for half a year), but I'm not sure about that. For some it seems too short, I might imagine. ^^ "


Good question, but I think there is no recipe ^^.
Love is something completely individual that cannot be so easily defined with a general period of time. One feels it as love after two weeks, the other may even take years.
In my opinion, there is also a big difference whether it is perceived as love or whether it is pronounced. There are often worlds in between. After all, it is (usually) not a conscious decision to say "As of today, I love him / her."
It develops and just happens - or it doesn't.

Experience has shown that it is often (not always) the case with younger people such as teenagers that one actually confesses one's love to oneself - simply because there is often no previous burden of previous relationships / separations / disappointments and one is even a little more open approaches the topic of love and relationships. But of course it always depends on the character and history of the person.

In general, I would make it dependent on the plot and your characters. If, as you say, you have a rather injured and suspicious boy, it is probably unrealistic for him to just go there after two weeks and confess his love to someone he has only recently met. It has to develop through the plot so that it becomes understandable for the reader what has changed in the character of your protagonist in order to give him the courage to open up to another person.

Charizard
Would you find it credible if after half a year one could not only speak of a teenage infatuation, but of a more serious relationship / love?
I know the parents of friends who met and married when they were sixteen or earlier. Of course, this is rare, but not impossible. Unfortunately, it is rarely shown credibly.
It is more and more difficult for young people to take their relationships seriously. Often for a good reason.


I understand what you're getting at, but I have to say that I always find it very sad when young people are only partially denied their feelings because of their age.
Of course, a teenager of this age has usually not had the life experience that a fifty-year-old person might have - of course. Nevertheless, teenagers (as well as children, by the way ^^) have a right to their feelings.
When a teen says he loves, he loves just like an adult would - just age-appropriate.
Of course, teenagers rarely have to argue about housekeeping, money, jobs, etc. - there are other issues that gnaw at their relationship. But just because there are other things that preoccupy a young person does not automatically mean that they are to be taken less seriously or that they are perceived differently.

Sorry, but that is a point that always upsets me a little when I hear sentences in the RL like: "You can't even know what love is, you're too young."
You may know a different kind of love - but your own feeling is just the way it is. πŸ™‚
"The art is always getting up more than you are knocked over."
(Winston Churchill)
Post # 3, written on April 18, 2015 | 03:03 am
@Pepsal
Thanks for the interesting contribution. = D
I went through a lot of things that you wrote and yes, I agree with many of them.

I didn't mean to say that I think every teenage relationship is superficial. ^^ If I think about it, there are also enough people in their mid-twenties / thirties who "find new love" every three weeks. ; D
But I often notice that young people and their relationships are not taken seriously and are dismissed as "gimmicks". Among other things, from people who have just got out of old age, but of course very much from those over 40. The effort to get them to be taken seriously is automatically even greater. ^^
Post # 4, written on April 25th, 2015 | 4:35 pm
As a computer scientist and mathematician, I would say that love is something that cannot be broken down into numbers or binary code. You can't calculate love either. Love is a coincidence

I've been in a relationship for 10 years, 6 months and 19 days now. Since my girlfriend works in Villach and I work in Graz, I have a weekend relationship and I always find it nice when we see each other on the weekend and I'm still as in love with her as I was 10 years ago. We already had a spark on the first evening we met.
Post # 5, written on April 26th, 2015 | 10:42 am
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last edited on 04/26/2015 | 10:43 a.m.
A very good question that has already been answered well here. I also think that you can't pinpoint it with numbers.

As Pepsal - in my opinion - correctly described, teenagers are simply still relatively untouched by disappointment, separation pain, etc., which leads to falling in love quickly. In addition, the sense of time in this phase is simply completely different. My first relationship lasted six months, but it felt like several years - in a positive way ;-)

The older you get, the more cautious you become. Of course, what is relevant in your case is the past. Seeing the family die is a dramatic experience that can change your personality on many levels.

Besides, it's still gay. That also plays a role, of course. Personally, it was so difficult for me to uten that there was no question of confessing my love to a girl.

Nobody can give you a clear answer, very individual story. Still, I would say that after about half a year of being together you can speak of love.
Article # 6, written on May 18, 2015 | 7:04 pm
In my experience, love grows with what you get through together.
So the more situations, both nice and sometimes not so nice, you get through with the "one", the better you get to know him. Only when you take off your so-called β€œrose-colored glasses” and learn to love the darker side of the β€œone” can you speak of real love.
This can be the case after a few months, but maybe not for years. This is also independent of age, although unfortunately many are of the opinion that a serious relationship can only work between two adults and there are a bunch of arguments for this, some of which are also true for isolated people (naivety, general lack of experience and the urge to To enjoy youth)
So half a year is not illogical. But it depends on the individual story and above all on the maturity of the characters. There is no ready-made timeline of when what begins or ends.
Article # 7, written on July 12th, 2015 | 11:11 pm
I find a good topic and I can get involved quite well with my main project.

How long is the period of time for your couple before you would really say that it is love?
There is no exact period of time I would say, it also depends on how the characters get closer. Whether the chemistry is right then and they notice that something is special between them. To take it from my own story, which aptly means ζ„› っ て ... γͺ に? (In English: What is love?) - My Prota has been wondering what love is for 19 chapters. Although she knows that she feels something, she cannot yet assign it and is not brave enough to take the step and say "I love this person." In addition, these are teenagers who have never been confronted with the topic before, hence the uncertainty. Even if the two are already dating, the Protas are still a bit confused about what love really is ... hence the title.

Or is there love at first sight?
I don't really believe in love at first sight, only interested at first sight .. so no .. can't really start with stories where the charas only fall head over heels the first time they see them. Although I have to say, we all know Romeo and Juliet ... one of my favorite stories is also admitted and it's about this so-called love on the first sight. .. so I guess it depends on how you pack it .. with enough drama it might be good after all ^^
But that's the only exception I can think of. Those who fall in love with their characters too quickly run the risk that the story will quickly become boring ^^ You should be careful.

Or are there also love stories that you would find credible after a few weeks or so?
As I said, it has to be something special. When you can really feel that the characters are close, and something connects them. Then maybe I'll buy it from ^^ I even know a couple in real life who got together after 2 weeks and they are still happy together after a good 10 years, so nothing is impossible?

Do you find it important to at least first establish a friendly base before a relationship develops?
Yes and no .. actually because the loved ones should get to know each other before they decide to be incredibly in love. BUT sometimes it can also happen that former enemies become lovers. Love has mysterious paths at times.

Another sensitive topic: How long should it take for enemies to become lovers?
It can happen so quickly! Because the believed enemy could do something that suddenly convinced the other person that the person wasn't that bad. But I wouldn't write about that they suddenly love each other wonderfully, but would build in a few arguments, see that it doesn't crash like in a car accident but the two slowly get closer .. touch each other, so to speak, until they are completely safe. As before, there is no time specification, it depends on the characters and the situation.
Lazy is such an ugly word, i prefer the term selective participation.
Post # 8, written on December 15, 2015 | 7:39 pm
Experience from my life:

The first time I saw my ex, I just had to start a conversation with him.
3 weeks and 2 meetings later we got together.
1 month later I would have got engaged to him if he had asked me.
(For legal reasons it would have taken a long time until the wedding because he was not an EU citizen)

So things can go fast in real life too.
Post # 9, written on December 27th, 2015 | 2:57 pm
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last edited on 12/27/2015 | 2:58 pm
I think that relationships between young people can and must be taken just as seriously as relationships between adults. Why not? I write in the romantic corner, and I have both texts that are about youthful protas and texts that deal with adults, and I find that in my opinion there is little difference when it comes to the emotions is in itself.

Sure, the focus may be different. A Prota in her late twenties is about how the romantic feelings can be reconciled with job and location, while with adolescent Protas, parents and peer groups play a role, but for everyone the focus is simply on: What do the feelings do to me, how does it work does it affect my life, my everyday life? Is the other person serious, can I trust them?

I'm not sixteen anymore, but I still remember that I took the relationships I started at that age as seriously as I do today - and it happened to me when I was sixteen and as an adult I fell head over heels in love with someone and had to realize weeks later that it was "just" a crush.
Personally, I do believe that you can feel drawn to each other spontaneously - and when you actually get together later, it means that it was love at first sight. (Oh, I don't have to 'believe' that - I've already experienced it myself.;))

Probably everyone defines the term "love" a little bit differently anyway - others don't need to see the severity behind it for some. In this respect, I have no problems at all when people talk about having fallen in love with the other person after a short period of time.
I know that most people make a strict distinction between "being in love" and "love", but I believe that there are very fluid transitions.
And I also think it's important to be able to feel the feeling of being in love even after years, because this "deep satisfaction & closeness" and so on, which generally defines "love", would not be enough for me. :)
It is said that your life flashes before your eyes just before you die. That is true, it's called Life.
(Terry Pratchett)
Post # 10, written on February 4th, 2016 | 12:20 a.m.
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last edited on 02/04/2016 | 12:26 am
"How long is it with your couple before you would really say that it is love?"
When they get together, it's mostly love, at least from one part. I'm one of the few who almost basically only lets couples get together very, very late in the story, and from that point of view I don't find it unrealistic that because love already exists, even if they haven't been together for years.

"Or or is there love at first sight?"
There are too. So at least being in love. But the couple still never get together that quickly, with me.

"Or are there love stories that you would find credible after a few weeks or so?"
Difficult to say ... In most books it goes way too fast for me. Especially when the characters quarrel like ravens at first, and then suddenly everything is bliss and sunshine. That's too stupid for me. I find peace joy pancakes boring again.
In reality, it usually doesn't take that long. So it's actually not unrealistic. But reality is kind of boring.

"Do you think it is important to at least first establish a friendly base before a relationship develops?"
I personally do. And my female characters too. I like cheesy happy endings, where I can be sure that the couple won't break up again after two or three years as soon as everyday life returns, because they actually have no common ground at all. I prefer a little more realism again.

"Another tricky subject: How long should it take for enemies to become lovers?"
Laaaaaange. Anything else would be stupid and, worse, yawning boring. Gone away potential.
Or it depends on whether you are dealing with enemies or rivals. E.g. two soldiers of an enemy nation who quickly fall in love with each other would be more credible than two rivals who are constantly trying to oust each other. This type of pairing often gets on my nerves quickly, maybe because it seems so popular in fan fiction. Enmity seems to be synonymous with love. Sure, it has a nice potential for conflict, but what's the point if it's not exploited?


And as far as young people are concerned: I find young people in stories almost basically boring, but since my boyfriend and I got together when we were 16 and 18 respectively and have been doing it for 16 years (and I don't plan to change that), we can I do not find the great love among teenagers unrealistic or even stupid.
I have seen beyond the bounds of infinity and drawn down demons from the stars ... I have harnessed the shadows that stride from world to world to sow death and madness ... Space belongs to me, do you hear?

- H.P. Lovecraft, From Beyond
Post # 11, written on March 22nd, 2016 | 9:01 pm
My boyfriend and I were both 15 years old when we got together. After a whopping 1 1/2 weeks and two meetings; D. And after 8 1/2 years I would say that is love to be taken seriously.
There is no such thing as "love" at first sight. Just a fall in love. Sure, you can immediately find someone mega attractive and charming and good-looking and, against better knowledge (since you don't know the other person), be totally crazy.
But love is something else. Something where you value the other person as they are, respect them, share life with each other (i.e. know everything about each other and do things together). When you can no longer live without the other.
That can be after a few weeks, if you have got to know each other really well.
Why many "adults" don't take adolescent love so seriously is because they think of themselves at that age. And even if you don't want to admit it, you're just a hormone-controlled teen. And still very innocent. And almost all young overdrafts break up at some point and are laughed at afterwards. But that does not mean that they are therefore not to be taken seriously.
You always only know yourself how you feel it.

For the story, it's important to get it across in a believable way. I think that's everything.
But "older" semesters, who had to go through real shit with their loved ones and had to pass really tough exams, will only be able to smile about some teenage problems. But that's not too tragic;)
Rank: program lover
Post # 12, written on July 20, 2016 | 09:50 am
How long is the period of time for your couple before you would really say that it is love?
Character traits are decisive for me - how quickly or slowly do you open up to your partner? How quickly / slowly are you addicted to your partner not only physically but also psychologically?

Or is there love at first sight?
If you've never seen or met each other before, that's possible. Lightning strikes.

Or are there also love stories that you would find credible after a few weeks or so?
Most romances end when both are 'together', still in love with each other. The greater the differences between the partners - origin, work / study, environment - the less credible the story.

Do you find it important to at least first establish a friendly base before a relationship develops?
This is the classic approach - the slow, gradual approach. Only works if you have bigger feelings for each other, but at the same time don't dare to express them.
Most relationships in our circle of acquaintances started differently. First sex, then get to know each other and everything else.

Another sensitive topic: How long should it take for enemies to become lovers?
For this one should be able to admit one's mistakes or to forgive oneself. In terms of time, there is almost always a time between enmity and friendship, a pause in which one does not see / meet. The best example is probably: enemies at school, then both do another training or study and only when both work and by chance see each other again, there is a friendship or relationship.


Charizard
For me personally, my protagonist is a fifteen-year-old, suspicious boy who has already been through a lot, in the sense that he saw his family die, but does not completely block the people around him. He knows he's gay. That's not the big hurdle. His future boyfriend is a sunny boy, a much more trustworthy, seventeen / eighteen-year-old boy from a well-protected home. They get to know each other and it's not love at first sight, but anything but dislike. : D After about two months they travel together (and with a friend), so they see each other every day / have a room for three: talk, get to know, fool around, experience a lot together, not nice things etc ... and maybe need them again Thumbs up two months for the first kiss, because being suspicious complicates life in some places and actually the hormones would urge such a fifteen-year-old in love to do so earlier, but he is too proud, deliberate, to be the victim of his hormones become. ^^ "
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Would you find it credible if after half a year one could not only speak of a teenage infatuation, but of a more serious relationship / love?
I know the parents of friends who met and married when they were sixteen or earlier. Of course, this is rare, but not impossible. Unfortunately, it is rarely shown credibly. It is more and more difficult for young people to take their relationships seriously. Often for a good reason.

Your example is only credible if your boy has a certain minimum level of trust in his future boyfriend from day 1 or Mr.Sunnyboy proves him every time anew that he can, may and maybe should be trusted. I would delete my girlfriend - building trust is better with two people.
Post # 13, written on 07/28/2016 | 12:59 p.m.
Marko
Most relationships in our circle of acquaintances started differently. First sex, then get to know each other and everything else.

I don't know anyone who started it like this ^^ "They were all long friends in advance or knew each other in another way for years.

Marko
Your example is only credible if your boy has a certain minimum level of trust in his future boyfriend from day 1 or Mr.Sunnyboy proves him every time anew that he can, may and maybe should be trusted. I would delete my girlfriend - building trust is better with two people.

Well, things are going a little differently now. A friend of Chris (the Sunnyboy x)) helps Sinan get off the street and teaches him his magic. This is how he gets to know Chris and other people. He tries to help him from the start, but he's not pushy.
Sinan has to slowly build up trust in the others too.
I can't delete my girlfriend or anyone else. They are important for the story, for him to find friendships ... for me xD
Post # 14, written on 07/28/2016 | 6:30 p.m.
Charizard
Marko
Most relationships in our circle of acquaintances started differently. First sex, then get to know each other and everything else.


I don't know anyone who started it like this ^^ "They were all long friends in advance or knew each other in another way for years.


Neither do I. And I have a stupid feeling in my stomach when I encounter this kind of "romance". Something always feels there for me to a certain extent not correct at ...
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Post # 15, written on July 29th, 2016 | 12:40 p.m.
Pepsal
Charizard
Would you find it credible if after half a year one could not only speak of a teenage infatuation, but of a more serious relationship / love?
I know the parents of friends who met and married when they were sixteen or earlier. Of course, this is rare, but not impossible. Unfortunately, it is rarely shown credibly.
It is more and more difficult for young people to take their relationships seriously. Often for a good reason.


I understand what you're getting at, but I have to say that I always find it very sad when young people are only partially denied their feelings because of their age.
Of course, a teenager of this age has usually not had the life experience that a fifty-year-old person might have - of course. Nevertheless, teenagers (as well as children, by the way ^^) have a right to their feelings.
When a teen says he loves, he loves just like an adult would - just age-appropriate.
Of course, teenagers rarely have to argue about housekeeping, money, jobs, etc. - there are other issues that gnaw at their relationship. But just because there are other things that preoccupy a young person does not automatically mean that they are to be taken less seriously or that they are perceived differently.

Sorry, but that is a point that always upsets me a little when I hear sentences in the RL like: "You can't even know what love is, you're too young."
You may know a different kind of love - but your own feeling is just the way it is. πŸ™‚


And how do I sign that!

My best friend was 15 when she fell in love with my best friend. now they have been together for over 9 years.
As a teen, it always hurt me when someone said they were downplaying my feelings with the above-mentioned sentences. It always sounded like "I don't take you seriously because you're too young to love."
As Svenja you can find it on hpfc.de and the great Hogwarts.

All these people saying they never got their Hogwarts letter: you got the letter. You went to Hogwarts. We were all there together.
Whether you come back by page or by the big screen, Hogwarts will always be there to welcome you home.
J.K. Rowling
Rank: program lover
Post # 16, written on August 1st, 2016 | 10:34 pm
Most relationships in our circle of acquaintances started differently. First sex, then get to know each other and everything else.
Charizard
I don't know anyone who started it like this ^^ "They were all long friends in advance or had known each other in another way for years.

Lapis Lazuli67
Neither do I. And I have a stupid feeling in my stomach when I encounter this kind of "romance". Something always feels there for me to a certain extent not correct at ...

Why wrong? You find someone you have fun with, notice the morning after that the other person is much more than a nice one-night butterfly and then there is the timid start of a relationship. Whether it really works afterwards depends more on the character traits than on other things.
By the way, I have my doubts the other way around if you have known each other for a long time. I wonder why it didn't spark earlier? Okay, if either of them was still married or something, there are good reasons, but otherwise?
Post # 17, written on August 2nd, 2016 | 00:10 am
Sometimes it just takes time ...

For example, I know both sides. I fell head over heels in love with someone I didn't even know AND I fell in love with someone I had known for two years and who I dealt with every day ...

Sometimes it just takes time ...
I am not half as dangerous as I sometimes look and much more dangerous than I usually appear.
"Laa shay'a waqu'in moutlaq bale kouloun moumkine!"
Post # 18, written on August 2nd, 2016 | 4:52 pm
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last edited on 08/02/2016 | 5:01 pm
Marko

Why wrong? You find someone you have fun with, notice the morning after that the other person is much more than a nice one-night butterfly and then there is the timid start of a relationship. Whether it really works afterwards depends more on the character traits than on other things.


Personality thing, I guess. Just not my thing. I couldn't share an intimate thing like sex with anyone I didn't even know (and therefore wouldn't want to look for someone to "have fun" with). I prefer to go the way of getting to know each other well and determining whether the character fits, instead of having sex first and THEN to see whether the character fits. Maybe that's why I prefer romances in principle where sex is the climax (pun intended πŸ˜‰) of the relationship development and not the beginning.

Marko
By the way, I have my doubts the other way around if you have known each other for a long time. I wonder why it didn't spark earlier?


Because it doesn't "have to" work straight away? Because sometimes it takes time for you to discover all the lovable qualities that you don't see if you only briefly know them? Because these lovable traits first have to overcome the hurdle of an appearance that may not originally have been appropriate? (By that I mean things like "absolutely must be dark-haired, sporty and at least 1.90 tall", which sometimes prevent you from noticing the blond asparagus tarzan with the sweet smile and "only" 1.75 size ^^.)

EDIT: By the way, I met my husband at school and he knew who I am for a while before I even noticed him. He wasn't dark-haired and blue-eyed like my long-time crush, but rather brown-haired with a red shimmer and brown-eyed.
Post # 19, written on August 3rd, 2016 | 5:23 pm
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last edited on 08/03/2016 | 5:31 pm
In this matter there is, I think, no "right" and "wrong", no "realistic" and no "unrealistic". It just differs from person to person, from situation to situation. In reality.
If you fall in love with someone instantly, it doesn't mean that it's just external or superficial. It also has to do with "chemistry" or genes (maybe also fate?). And some characteristics or interests can also be recognized very quickly (such as similar hobbies, etc.). Still, I don't think it has to spark right away. Feelings can change after a long time. Or maybe they are only really noticed after a long time ^^ Also in reality.

Still, I don't like stories about sex and then relationships. I just find it boring. Most of the time in such cases the romance is over-emphasized, or worse, the drama, which then often makes it really illogical (to me), and there is just no tension ...
I have seen beyond the bounds of infinity and drawn down demons from the stars ... I have harnessed the shadows that stride from world to world to sow death and madness ... Space belongs to me, do you hear?

- H.P. Lovecraft, From Beyond
Post # 20, written on August 5th, 2016 | 6:15 p.m.
A little off-topic maybe, but:
It just occurred to me that I've been getting upset about lyrics lately, which is exactly what it's about. Have sex but don't know what's going to happen and then cry about the subject for three or four minutes. Does she love me Can something come of it? What if she doesn't love me Mimimimi.

And then I'm always annoyed and just think "it's my own fault" 😈
Rank: program lover
Post # 21, written on August 6th, 2016 | 2:49 pm
Lapis Lazuli67
... that lately I've been getting upset about lyrics, which are exactly what they're about. Have sex but don't know what's going to happen and then cry about the subject for three or four minutes. Does she love me Can something be made of it? What if she doesn't love me ...
Fits well with the topic because ... Altais
In this matter there is, I think, no "right" and "wrong", no "realistic" and no "unrealistic". It just differs from person to person, from situation to situation. In reality.
And therefore also in books, films, music, etc. πŸ˜„

Altais
Still, I don't like stories about sex and then relationships. I just find it boring. Most of the time in such cases the romance is over-emphasized, or worse, the drama, which then often makes it really illogical (to me), and there is just no tension ...
Yes and no. Yes, because all too often these types of stories build on the effect - the author thinks that sex attracts a lot of readers in the beginning. Yes, because such a story is often stretched too long or vice versa: this topic is enough for a short story and no further. No, because something like that is also close to reality.
Tension-free is true: apart from a (small) shock effect for the environment, there is usually little exciting to talk about when it comes to love.
Rank: Ultrahardcore blogger
Post # 22, written on August 6th, 2016 | 7:20 pm
I do not think so ;)

Either you have a plot or you don't. Whether sex at the beginning or at the end doesn't matter.
Post # 23, written on August 10th, 2016 | 4:35 pm
Unit 01
I do not think so ;)

You either have a plot or you don't. Whether sex at the beginning or at the end doesn't matter.


I would largely agree with that. Of course, sex attracts readers at the beginning, but that doesn't mean the plot has to be boring or without tension. After all, it should be in the foreground, otherwise we would have PwP. For example, is there dealing with the environment with this kind of getting to know each other? I mean, we are already very skeptical about it here, what do family and friends say then? This is not the case in the perfect world, but external influences can certainly destroy a functioning relationship.
I am not half as dangerous as I sometimes look and much more dangerous than I usually appear.
"Laa shay'a waqu'in moutlaq bale kouloun moumkine!"
Rank: Ultrahardcore blogger
Post # 24, written on November 4th, 2016 | 12:45 p.m.
Kara Silver
... external influences can definitely destroy a functioning relationship.


Such a relationship has never worked when the couple let themselves be ruined by external circumstances. Then, in my opinion, love wasn't strong enough.
As Svenja you can find it on hpfc.de and the great Hogwarts.

All these people saying they never got their Hogwarts letter: you got the letter. You went to Hogwarts. We were all there together.
Whether you come back by page or by the big screen, Hogwarts will always be there to welcome you home.
J.K. Rowling
Post # 25, written on November 4th, 2016 | 12:47 pm
Svenja2
Such a relationship has never worked when the couple let themselves be ruined by external circumstances. Then, in my opinion, love wasn't strong enough.


Then you've probably never had to deal with a stubborn "monster-in-law" ... πŸ˜‹ 😁
"The art is always getting up more than you are knocked over."
(Winston Churchill)

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