Which of these is grammatically correct

Grammatical or Grammatical?

Basically, the two adjectives, ie “grammatical” and “grammatical”, describe two different things.

Grammatically

Using the term “grammatical” describes something that is essentially grammar. For example, the declension of adjectives, the conjunction of verbs or a case ending is grammatical.

  • The ending of the word is grammatical.

In this case, the ending of a word is, in its essence, grammar. The ending is therefore a grammatical element and not a mathematical one. Can be used “grammatically” as attributive adjective use in front of a subject, then the compound is also correct.

  • The grammatical ending is a grammar ending.

Furthermore, “grammatical” can also mean the purpose of a Predicate fulfill.

  • The ending is grammatical, but not mathematical.

Grammatically

If something is not grammatical in its essence, but relates to grammar, then the term “grammatical” is used.

  • He speaks grammatically incorrectly.

If someone speaks grammatically incorrectly, then something has not been articulated in the sense of the grammar. In terms of content, however, what has been said can be correct. Since the lexic can also mean grammatical, some formulations are lexically incorrect. The lexicon refers to the vocabulary, i. H. if two words are confused with one another or a word has a different meaning, this is lexically incorrect.

Conclusion

If you describe something that is essentially grammar, then it is grammatical. On the other hand, if you refer to grammar, then it is grammatical. Basically, one can assume that in everyday life one speaks less about the essence of grammar than about issues that relate to grammar. In most cases, therefore, the term “grammatical” is meant.