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Joe Kaeser: The former Siemens CEO takes stock after 100 days

100 days after leaving Siemens AG as CEO, Kaeser took stock in a post on LinkedIn and talked about his new life.

He never thought that it would be so easy to just let go, writes Kaeser.

The manager is concerned that the conflicts between values ​​and interests are increasing in an increasingly divided world and that the socio-economic gap is widening. The climate crisis is the greatest task of our time.

Joe Kaeser has, as he himself says, “a remarkable journey” behind him. The career of the now 63-year-old at the long-established German company Siemens began in March 1980 and ended in February 2021 - as long-standing CEO. 100 days after leaving Siemens AG as CEO, Kaeser took stock in a post on LinkedIn and talked about his new life.

He is a "happy grandfather, busy board member, trustworthy advisor and committed global citizen". He never thought that it would be so easy to just let go, writes Kaeser.

"There is life out there too."

Life outside of the large corporation is "really good". Kaeser states: “There is also life out there.” The first 100 days were great, even if a little more exhausting than expected.

Kaeser has thought about it, he writes, what he could do with all his experiences. He speaks of lessons learned from mistakes; the recipes for building strong teams; how to deal with the temptations of power. How to find business friends and real friends or how to deal with the increasing conflicts between values ​​and interests in an increasingly divided world.

Influence of climate activists

As CEO of Siemens, he met many personalities: the Queen, the Pope, Barack Obama, Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump and Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. And many more presidents, writers, singers, actors or athletes. But also climate and other activists: They would have reminded him that “it is our task to leave a better world behind - and certainly not to destroy one”.

Kaeser writes that he could write an autobiography, but he doesn't want to. The corona pandemic has shown that the conflicts between values ​​and interests are increasing in an increasingly divided world and that the socio-economic gap is widening. In the future, he writes, he would like to comment on topics that interest users on LinkedIn and is asking for their feedback.

Climate crisis the "greatest and most urgent task of our time"

He asks, “Are we going to draw the right conclusions? Will there be a better world after COVID-19? Are we going to change our planet for the better, at least in some areas? ”There is no such thing as“ Planet B ”- coping with the climate crisis is most likely“ the greatest and most urgent task of our time ”.